• By admin

Christie’s recently announced the sale of the first-ever purely digital artwork to go to auction: Everydays—The First 5000 Days by Mike Winkelmann, also known through his art name, Beeple.

The art will be offered in a standalone online sale sale geared towards new and younger collectors and currently has the art world abuzz.

Will NFT’s be the next big thing in art?

For those who are totally unfamiliar, NFTs (non fungible tokens) refer to a unique digital code attached directly to a digital image, like a carfax, or a social security number! It verifies that the image is one of a kind and solves issues of provenance.

That makes its authorship and ownership totally traceable and transparent in the web. The digital work is “tokenized” through a platform like MakersPlace, and then put out into the marketplace to be bought and traded for cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin or Etherium, two types of cryptocurrency.

To learn more, go to sites like SuperRare and see how the digital gallery looks very familiar and accessible. We all are used to going cashless at this point, so it’s really not that much of a leap. You can also look at some youtube videos published by SuperRare offering a basic tutorial.

The questions I have are whether or not the digital art space will be yet another place where the art world’s systemic racism and sexism will rear its ugly head.

Obviously the institutions most well positioned will be the ones who can funnel the money into invading a space and poaching the best artists.

The art world has lots of biases, and it’s notoriously and ironically resistant to accepting new ideas, but maybe, perhaps, this is also an opportunity for people who would otherwise be left out, to get in!

Creators and people in collectives don’t need the money that big institutions have to enter the market and use their ingenuity and talent.
They still need marketing and business savvy to generate name recognition. The top galleries don’t have large followings…yet.

I also wonder how long it will take for the academic pillar of the art world to start connecting the dots from an inter-disciplinary standpoint and begin documenting and critiquing.

The path to legitimization for an artist, no matter the medium, has traditionally involved getting the endorsement of certain institutions.

As more people from diverse backgrounds, without the reverence for historical (racist, sexist) modes of art credentialing, push their way into the art conversation, then perhaps the need for certain traditional gatekeepers will erode, instead of new practices of exploitation evolving.

According to Christie’s postwar and contemporary specialist Noah Davis compared the legitimization of NFTs to that of Street Art.

“Not unlike the advent of Street Art as a blue-chip collecting category, NFT-based art is on the threshold of becoming the next ingeniously disruptive force in the art market,” he said in a statement.

If that is the case, that could be as I said before, the evolution of a new form of artist exploitation—and cultural pillaging.

Or it could open the floodgates of opportunity to all the deserving artists whose talent and work is rendered invisible by mainstream art venues because of their color or gender, as they remain drastically underrepresented in galleries and museums, and in blue-chip auctions like these…

What effect will this Christie’s auction will have on people in embracing and adopting this new form of art?

Will people of color and women benefit from the accessibility of entering into the digital art world without a gallery, or will they get left out of the gold rush?

What do you know about digital art and NFT’s?

Let me know your thoughts!

For those who are totally unfamiliar, NFT’s (non fungible tokens) refer to a unique digital code attached directly to a digital image, like a carfax, or a social security number! It verifies that the image is one of a kind, and solves issues of provenance.

Making it’s authorship and ownership totally traceable and transparent in the web. The digital work is “tokenized” through a platform like makers place, and then put out into the marketplace to be bought and traded for cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin or Etherium, two denominations of cryptocurrency.

To learn more, go to sites like super rare or and see how the digital gallery looks very familiar and accessible. We all are used to going cashless at this point, so it’s really not that much of a leap. You can also look at some youtube videos published by super rare offering a basic tutorial.

The questions I have are whether or not the digital art space will be yet another place where the art world’s systemic racism and sexism will rear its ugly head.

Obviously the institutions most well positoned will be the ones who can funnel the money into invading a space and poaching the best artists.

The art world has lots of biases, and is notoriously and ironically resistant to accepting new ideas, but maybe perhaps, this is also an opportunity for people who would otherwise be left out, to get in!

Creators and people in collectives, don’t need the money that big institutions have to enter the market and use their ingenuity and talent.
They still need marketing and business savvy to generate name recognition. The top galleries don’t have large followings…yet.

I also wonder how long it will take for the academic pillar of the art world to start connecting the dots from an inter-disciplinary standpoint and began documenting and critiquing.

The path to legitimization for an artist, no matter the medium, has traditionally involved getting the endorsement of certain institutions.

As more people from diverse backgrounds, without the reverence for historical (racist, sexist) modes of art credentialing, push their way into the art conversation, then maybe perhaps the need for certain traditional gatekeepers will erode, instead of new practices of exploitation evolving.

According to Christie’s postwar and contemporary specialist Noah Davis compared the legitimization of NFTs to that of Street Art.

“Not unlike the advent of Street Art as a blue chip collecting category, NFT-based art is on the threshold of becoming the next ingeniously disruptive force in the art market,” he said in a statement.

If that is the case, that could be as I said before, the evolution of a new form of artist exploitation, and cultural pillaging.

Or it could open the floodgates of opportunity to all the deserving artists whose talent and work is rendered invisible by mainstream art venues because of their color or gender, as they remain drastically Underrepresented in galleries and museums, and in blue chip auctions like these…

What effect will this Christie’s auction will have on people in embracing and adopting this new form of art?

Will people of color, and women benefit from the accessibility of entering into the digital art without a gallery, or will they get left out of the gold rush?

What do you know about digital art and NFT’s?

Let me know your thoughts!

  • February 19, 2021
  • 6:53 pm
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